Factors Affecting Students’ Academic Performance

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Juliet Cadungog-Uy CamEd Business School 2019

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ABSTRACT   This study determines the factors affecting students’ academic performance. It covers 190 student respondents. Results show that class attendance and academic performance of female students are slightly better than males. Students who graduated high school from public school are performing better in class. Students who enrolled in the Accounting program because of their parents’ decision have lower class attendance, mid-term and computer based exam (CBE) scores compared to students who choose accountancy course on their own. Students taking two subjects only have higher class attendance, mid-term and CBE scores. Students who live in Phnom Penh have higher class attendance, mean mid-term and CBE scores compared to those coming from the provinces. Majority watched Youtube, use Facebook and Internet surfing however non-users have higher average mid-term and CBE scores and class attendance. Students who combined studying in groups and studying alone got the highest average mid[1]term and CBE scores. Almost half of the students prefer to study at home but those with higher class attendance are likely to have higher mid-term score regardless of the place they prefer to study. Those who spend 20 hours or more weekly in the library and those who study more than 15 hours before long exams have obtained the highest average mid-term and CBE scores. Students studying one week before the exam have higher scores than those who study one month before. Students with difficulty in reading English have higher risk of failing the exam. Poor reading skills have strong gravity pull on the scores despite student’s long study hours.   Keywords: Academic performance, paper F1, Computer-based examination (CBE) scores, technology-related activities

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